Celebrity influencer Khloe Kardashian promotes a fitness shake to her 96.6 million Instagram followers.

Celebrity influencer Khloe Kardashian promotes a fitness shake to her 96.6 million Instagram followers.

From sparkling water, to teeth-whitening services, to monthly subscription boxes, brands across industries are investing big marketing dollars in influencer campaigns to reach audiences on social media. In the last few years, though, the #sponsored and #ad tags have evolved from discrete footnotes to glaring advertisements on our feeds. In an age where consumers are sniffing out authenticity and turning their backs on traditional marketing efforts, how can you ensure your influencer campaign sticks? Here are a few tips:  

Know what you’re looking for.

It’s important to examine why you’re exploring an influencer marketing campaign versus other options. Are you trying it because it’s trendy, or because it’s the most effective strategy to accomplish your campaign goals? Identifying what success looks like early on will keep your influencer campaign on track from the get-go.

Pickiness is key.

Though traditional reporters and influencers are operationally different, PR pros should approach the two similarly. Keeping your goal in mind, identify the influencers that authentically align with your brand. Look beyond their content and follower numbers – factors like audience engagement, location, post style/frequency, and other brand partnerships should play into your decision of who to approach. If they don’t feel like the perfect fit from every angle, they’re probably not. 

Gut-check your authenticity.

A successful influencer campaign is often judged by how well it’s received by the influencer’s following, and social users today can sniff out phony marketing content right away. Keep your campaign legitimate by outlining your partnership expectations while letting the influencer create their own posts. Just like reporters, no two influencers are the same. Customizing your approach to each influencer prevents the copy and paste effect that we so often see (and ignore) on our social feeds.

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