Viewing entries tagged
digital marketing

Blake’s Take: Keep the C-Suite Strategic

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Blake’s Take: Keep the C-Suite Strategic

An interesting article recently came out at CIO Dashboard, entitled “Who’s in Charge of Digital?” The world often presents dramatic business changes that cause questions about C-suite roles and responsibilities. But I'd caution leaders to pay close attention when changes are proposed to executive designations.

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On the Radar: Snapchat

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve heard of Snapchat. The mobile app has done some big things lately and is making strides toward becoming a relevant social platform and news source – so much so that The Wall Street Journal and the White House have jumped on the bandwagon. WSJ         

The Wall Street Journal is now publishing stories on Snapchat and it’s safe to say Snapchat has officially earned a seat at the social media VIP table. The pairing of an established and prestigious newspaper with an app primarily used by millennials is a win for both parties. For the Journal, it’s an avenue to reach and retain young readers. For Snapchat, whose users are mostly young people, the addition of the Journal may appeal to an older audience and attract new advertisers.

The White House

Yep, the White House joined Snapchat just in time for the President’s State of the Union address last month. This isn’t the first time the Obama administration has taken strides in the social media world – President Obama is the first sitting president to have his own Twitter account and Facebook page. Obama’s director of product management said the White House was joining Snapchat to reach the growing percentage of the population that uses the app to consume news and share with friends. I bet Snapchat was pretty pleased to hear the White House thinks the app is 1) big enough to reach the national audience and 2) a legit news outlet for something as prestigious as the SOTU.

Geofilter

Geofilter

Geofilters

Snapchat has offered geofilters – geographically restricted graphics that can be added to a user’s photo or video – for a while. However, it just introduced a new geofilter option that will allow anyone, even smaller companies, to submit temporary geofilters for a party or an event for a $5 fee. The company currently receives floods of “on-demand” geofilter submissions, but Snapchat hopes the fee will slow the pipeline to a more manageable number of submissions. As Snapchat continues to grow, this is a huge innovative step in terms of both revenue and user retention.

Whether you’re a fan of Snapchat or not, you can’t deny the company’s ingenuity and strategy. The app is constantly searching for ways to reach a broader target market AND create new channels of revenue.

Bravo, Snapchat, bravo.

(Featured photo: via Flickr; Geofilter photo: via Flickr)

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PR by the Micro-Moment

Earlier this month, PRSA Dallas hosted Martin Waxman, APR to speak at a well-attended social media workshop. He provided strategic insight that was easy to both understand and implement, but I was particularly interested in the concept of “PR by the micro-moment.” Google describes micro-moments as “a critical opportunity for brands to shape our decisions and preferences.” Where are we turning to in these moments? Presumably, our iPhones.

During the discussion, Waxman referenced an interesting article by Scientific American on how the Internet is beginning to replace a friend or family member as a companion in sharing the daily tasks of remembering things. Because of our dependence on mobile devices, we are increasingly turning to Google or Siri to give us the answer we want NOW.

Watch this Think Google video on how Dunkin ' Donuts is engaging in the micro-moment.
Watch this Think Google video on how Dunkin ' Donuts is engaging in the micro-moment.

What does this mean for marketing and public relations? Everything has changed. Waxman posits brands are looking at audiences the wrong way. Throw demographics out the window and instead understand that the immediate need of a consumer supersedes any brand loyalty.

Remember Google’s mobilegeddon? Website rankings are now penalized if not optimized for mobile. They did that for the convenience of their consumers, who could be your consumers too. Lisa Gevelber, vice president of marketing at Google, writes “When someone has a want or need, they turn to their smartphone for help—whether it's a karate newbie watching an expert do a move on YouTube or a mom looking for the best deal on a pair of sneakers. When a need arises, people turn to search and YouTube to look for answers, discover new things, and make decisions.”

Life imitating art yet? Here’s the takeaway:

The Home Depot shifted DIY focus to women with Do-it-Herself workshops and tutorials.
The Home Depot shifted DIY focus to women with Do-it-Herself workshops and tutorials.

First, you need to be there when the customers arrive in these micro-moments. This means creating a web presence that straddles search engines, social media networks and wherever else your audience may be lurking. Brand strategy also needs to incorporate more than just mere presence to win over a potential customer. The content available needs to be useful to the consumer. The information needs to be offered clearly and in an easily digestible way. Think DIY videos or short, practical case studies—whatever best meets their need. Finally, the strategy needs to incorporate a real-time component. How many times have you closed an Internet tab or exited an app because the load time took too long? Work to create a desire path making the user experience seamless and quick.

Micro-moments are completely changing the game and the opportunity is palpable.  Whether you’re working with a corner store or Coca-Cola, shifting your focus to enhancing the consumer journey through these micro-moments will surely elevate your marketing success.

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Powerful HAS#TAGS Build PR Results

Although hashtags are still used to accumulate common posts, they’re being used more and more as a means to spread news, ideas or trends – a virtual word-of-mouth, if you will. They have also proven to be a valuable PR tool. In 2013, Baylor University's athletic department used a hashtag to help spread the word and build excitement about an upcoming football game.